food blog

Carnivore Club Champions Scottish Charcuterie 


If you’ve been reading for a while then you’ll know that I love meat, I love local and I love trying new things. So when I was emailed by a company that send you boxes of Artisan British charcuterie it immediately piqued my interest. Each month uses a different charcuterie company and this months box contained meat from a Highland business called Great Glen Charcuterie. 



Great Glen Charcuterie are based in Roybridge, which is down Spean Bridge/ Fortwilliam way. I’d heard of them and been wanting to try their meat so this was a great taster box. They specialise in charcuterie using wild Scottish venison that they make by hand and air dry. 


The Carnivore Club is essentially an online company that send you meat. They use different British charcuterie companies every month so that you can try meat from smaller companies that you might not have heard of. Good for small businesses to get the word out. You can order a box as a one-off for a gift or start a monthly/bi-monthly/quarterly subscription. 
Perfect timing as it’s much easier for us to have a nice dinner in than out right now with a little baby. 

It arrived by courier and the meat was encased in a sturdy gift box. Inside there was a leaflet with information about the box and serving suggestions and five different products to try: two salamis, two chorizos and a venison bresaola. The aforementioned were venison pork salami, green peppercorn salami, chili venison chorizo & venison and pork chorizo. 

The first meat that we tried was the pork & venison chorizo. We used it in place of bacon on treat night in a creamy seafood pasta… delicious! We then used the venison and pork chorizo in place of our regular chorizo in our affectionately named ‘sexy pasta’ that uses roasted Mediterranean veg and herbs. Again, it was lovely. We liked both of the products and the only thing we found was that the chorizos weren’t as oily or paprika-y as normal chorizo so adjust recipes accordingly. 

The salamis are rich and tasty, a fantastic addition to an antipasti board alongside cheese, olives and proscuitto. 
The bresaola is being kept until date night because it is the one we are looking forward to the most. I’ll be doing it the traditional way with rocket and shaved Parmesan on top of the slices then drizzle some extra virgin olive oil over it. 

I thought that the box was good value. It’s £29 if you subscribe and £32 for a one-off and if my maths were right the box had £27.41 worth of products (not to mention the nice gift box) plus Great Glen charge £4.95 delivery so you’re making a saving. Since getting the box I’ve spotted Great Glen charcuterie at The Storehouse & Corner on the Square and they are (obviously) a little more expensive than buying direct so The Carnivore Club are competitive price wise. 

To get it every month you’d have to be a true carnivore, I would say that I am more on the bi-monthly part of the scale. The boxes are compiled using British companies & I hope to see and try more Scottish charcuterie in the future as I like to support local. 
We have friends scattered all over the UK and I’m constantly wracking my brain over what to buy them as gifts that are easy to send but still special so this will really help me out. It’s also a nice idea for new parents who might not go out for a while so that they can treat themselves at home.
I can be somewhat sceptical about these subscription services that send you things because I don’t always feel that they are good value for money but I can honestly say that the box I was sent by the Carnivore Club felt like it was. I’ve seen photos online of another box and it also looked like you got your money’s worth. A nice way to spend some disposable income on or to gift someone. Just not to a vegetarian! 

 

N.B The Carnivore Club kindly sent me a box to try. There was no pressure to be nice about it so I just gave my honest opinion. Im very selective about what I write about so research anyone who contacts me first. I’m actually about to order another box! 
This content has also been posted on my sister blog Highland Foodie 

Glasgow is Italys Paesano  

  
Everyone has an opinion about pizza. Whether you are a self proclaimed ‘foodie’ that goes to the award winning restaurants, the one who has visited Italy, the student who eats them all the time or Joe Bloggs… you probably have an opinion on what a good pizza should be like. For me pizza was affordable as a student and I felt comfortable treating myself to dinner out at an Italian restaurant. It was a gateway into going out for dinner more, branching out and trying new foods. Topping combinations have got ever more inventive over the years too. Sometimes too crazy in my opinion – they lose sight of what the classic pizza is. 


My dad describes pizza in Italy as having big blown out doughy sides and minimal cheese and toppings. Quality not quantity. I should get to experience it myself next year but in the meantime a new kid on the block had opened in Glasgow claiming to do authentic Italian pizzas. All independent Paesano sell is pizza and a few sides – 8 pizzas to be exact. It’s now acceptable to only offer one thing – and minimal choices of – in a restaurant, on trend in fact. Some people may not like it but, if you’ve read other posts of mine, I’m an advocate of doing less things well. 
  
The restaurant inside has an industrial feel. It’s in a big building on Miller Street & the seating is wooden benches and canteen style tables. Urban chic if you will. Definitely not somewhere for you if you like a cushioned seat with a structured back. Dare I utter the words that this is a ‘young’ place. Oops, I might as well have said hipster. Please forgive my sweeping generalisation but here goes. I only mean that in the sense that most twenty year olds that I’ve encountered couldn’t care less what they sit on, how loud a place is and generally like a large social space. On the other hand, most sixty year olds that I know want comfy seating and to be able to have a conversation without having to raise their voice. I am 31 years old and I’ve started to care about it more and more! Luckily Paesano didn’t have music blaring and the seats were comfy enough to feed my bambino. 
 

White Anchovies

 
We had warmed our bellies up with some white anchovies and now it was all down to the pizza. It was lunchtime and they arrived quickly so this is the sort of place that you could come to in your lunch hour. 

At Paesano they pride themselves on proper imported Italian ingredients being cooked in a wood fired oven that comes from Naples. Initial impressions were positive – big blown out sides of fired dough with scattered toppings in the middle. They use fior di latte mozzarella (unless you upgrade to Buffalo), which I prefer to buffalo mozzarella as it has a creamier and less smoky flavour. 
  
You could tell that the toppings used were of a high quality, from the tasty cotto ham to the sweet tomato sugo. The pizzas had a delicious crispy sourdough crust that contrasted with the soft centre. 

The middle of the pizza was soft and might challenge what you are used to. On first thought the word soggy came to mind but I generally use that word negatively and this wasn’t a negative. Sure, it was the kind of pizza that is best eaten with cutlery but I think that we’ve just gotten too used to cardboard like bases on our pizza over here. I’ll be the first to admit that a pizza with a soft middle can put me off but this one was different. It was soft because the balls of fior di latte have a softer texture, because the sugo isn’t pumped with filler to make it thicker and because the toppings were chosen on flavour and not on moisture levels. 
  
The ice-cream bowls are cute and score points with me. I’m hoping they have a few short bowls for children because it’s a disaster waiting to spill in a tall dish. 

The soft ice-cream has that milky tone to it as opposed to overly creamy. Something that is important in Italian ice-cream from what I understand. Anyway, I liked it and the sauces gave it a retro feel. 
  
For fellow parentals, there is baby change and the staff were accommodating and courteous about the fact that I had a little baba in tow with pram and all that comes with it. 
We encountered waiting staff and management and found them all to be friendly and approachable. 

I’ll get my dad to visit next time he’s in Glasgow to see if they get the authentic seal of approval. He talks about real Italian pizza all the time so he’s my man in the know. 

It was a tasty pizza indeed and I enjoyed my experience. We went for lunch but it’s also the kind of informal place that’s ideal for a few friends post work to enjoy pizza and a beer. With my hearing it’d probably be too loud on a Saturday night but I’ll be back midweek with my own paesano. 

Tantrum Doughnuts Made My Day

 


I would class myself as a doughnut lover. When I was pregnant my sister, niece & I drove a five hour round trip to satisfy my pregnancy cravings of doughnuts and peri-peri chicken so I’m pretty sure that I qualify. 

Without sounding too like Nigella, there’s something about a warm filled doughnut that can’t be beaten – it’s so naughty and indulgent. 




The newest doughnut shop to hit my radar is in on of my favourite spots in the city, the hip without being polished Finnieston. So many foodie places have opened in the area in recent years that you don’t want to miss it. Tantrum Doughnuts is set a couple of minutes walk away from Kelvingrove Art Gallery where Cushion & Cake used to be. They appear to be primarily a takeaway but have some seats inside if you can’t wait until you get home to eat. Coffee, milkshakes and handmade doughnuts are the menu entirety and I was sure they’d do it well. 
Their Facebook page had been teasing me for weeks so I was determined to try them out. They make their own marshmallow for goodness sakes! 
 

some of their facebook photos that had been enticing me in

 

We were going to a friends house so we bought a selection of creme brulee, peanut butter & jelly and jam filled. In retrospect I should have bought a sneaky chocolate number for the next day. 
  

The doughnuts were divine! The creme brulee even cracked as you bit into it and the dough was light enough and tasty. 
  

I love their slightly unusual flavours and hope that they continue to rotate them to show their skills. The owners have a history cooking in top restaurants and it’s evident when you go in. Even the denim dresses worn by the staff go with the feel of the place, the attention to detail is incredible. 

Keep up the good work Tantrum, maybe one day in the future I’ll be back with more pregnancy cravings. 

Being Bad At Five Guys

Cheating on someone is a horrible business. There’s this overwhelming guilt that keeps feelings cooped up inside- feelings of worthlessness and shame. How will I ever go back? 

Today I am forcing myself to be brave and put into words what I did. Here goes, please don’t judge. 

 I cheated on Bread Meats Bread… I cheated on local and I cheated on Glasgow as I knew it… I went to Five Guys for lunch. I’m sorry, really sorry. 

In my defence, we were going to go to Bread Meats Bread but the queue was long and we were pushed for time. Five Guys had been on my will-I-won’t-I radar for a while so we just did it. In my account of our visit I will be as objective as I can be & throw my guilt aside. 


  

We stepped in through the unfamiliar doors to a big menu on the wall and a counter to order at. There was no queue so we could order immediately after choosing. As you can see from the menu, you choose a basic burger type or hot dog then customise it. I asked for a cheeseburger with mayo, pickles, ketchup & onions. As much as I like vegetables, too much in a burger can make the whole experience fall apart. Fries – the only side they seem to do- completed my food order & I went for a refillable drink to wash it down. 
They gave us cups for the self serve so we helped ourselves. I like a cheeky cherry coke on occasion and this was one of those days. We then waited at the service area for our number to be called. It was nice to watch them making the burgers & quite atmospheric listening to the chefs shout back and forth. I guess it added to the American burger joint feel that I’d expected. 
  
There are three floors of seats and, as the ground floor was pretty full, we chose to go upstairs. This was the biggest mistake we made because it was VERY loud. I felt like I’d gone back to the school canteen. Between the noise of other diners (many under 20 years old & giddly on too much refillable coke) & the shouting from the kitchen downstairs, I developed a headache. A burger tends to be my hangover food but there’s no way I would choose somewhere so noisy the day after the night before so it gets crossed off that list. I went down to the basement to the toilet and it was somewhat quieter down there but I imagine with such a low roof it only takes a couple of tables of teenagers to turn rowdy. I’m only 31 so it makes me feel old writing about the noise but it just shows how loud it is – my mum would have walked straight back out. 
  

On to the burger and fries. The burger itself consisted of two thin patties and they were still juicy with lots of oozy cheese. The bun held together but didn’t have the sweetness that I prefer from a brioche. I still really enjoyed the burger and would give it 8/10. The fries were crispy outside and soft inside – a good effort indeed. One regular sized fries is enough for two people so don’t buy two or you’ll be left with lots or have to be rolled out of there. 

A couple more sides – maybe some onion rings for instance – would have added to the experience. 

  
I was disappointed to see that the fries are cooked in peanut oil considering how many people are allergic to nuts. There was no alternative to this on the board so I assume that there is none. They also give out free peanuts & they were placed in boxes with scoops around the place. If you’ve ever been on an aeroplane & it’s come over the tannoy that nuts are not being served due to another passenger with a serious allergy then surely you’ll see the flaw in Five Guys plan. Everyone loves a freebie and a novelty idea but when a reported 1 in every 100 people in the UK are allergic to peanuts* it seems nonsensical. 
  
So my visit really was full of peaks & troughs. The food was a high point but the noise and peanut thing was a real low point for me. It’s such a shame as the food was a solid effort. After speaking to a friend who thought the same thing maybe Five Guys need to look into creating a more comfortable atmosphere in the stark white building. 

I’ve been dithering about if I’d go back or not because of this & I guess it depends on availability of seats at the other nearby places on burger street. Maybe they have got their target market and I’m not it but students must have more money now than they used to if they’re to keep this place going. Parents might like the noise so they don’t feel self-conscious about their loud kids too. It falls more into the takeaway category for me but is a pricey takeaway at £13.25 for a cheeseburger, small fries & drink. 

*Source: http://patient.info/health/nut-allergy

Number 16 – Should Be Up Every Glasgow Street

 

Not every dinner that I write about involves masses of time taking photos and researching – life is for living after all. The night in question this time was spent in Number 16 restaurant on Byres Road, in the heart of Glasgows West End. Unbeknown to me, this meal was the last restaurant blow-out that I would have for a while involving copious amounts of vino now that I’m on a nine month plus sabbatical so I’m glad it was such an enjoyable night. 

The photos are terrible due to low lighting issues and prosecco, but they’re the only ones I have so I’m including them anyway. 
The first starter to arrive is a dish that showcases what I would describe as Number 16’s signature style – they excel at Asian cooking as much as they do Scottish & you’re always flipping a coin in there over which route to go down. It was Asian spiced beef tempura with wasabi mayonnaise, sweet chilli, coriander and pickled radish. Tempura doesn’t often look pretty but they managed it here, and kept the batter light and crisp. Scooping a bit of each element of the dish into each mouthful was important here to appreciate the sweet, spicy, acidic flavours as one & it was a fantastic dish. 

 

Tempura £7.50

 
  

Crispy ham hock terrine won as the starter of preference with two of the table choosing it. No 16 served it with vanilla & apple purée, sweet & sour raisins and piccalilli but the accompaniments sounded too sweet for me. The two of them thought it was delicious and, having tried some, I changed my mind too although I’m not one for vanilla with savoury. 

Terrine £6.50

 I’ve had soup in here before and they always pull it off so I don’t feel hard done by looking at other starters as I sometimes do in other restaurants with soup. This time it was cream of wild mushroom with tarragon and white truffle oil. Consistency and depth of flavour were exactly perfect for me and the tarragon shone through without eclipsing the mushrooms. The truffle oil added an earthy element and further emphasised the shrooms in the dish. 

Soup £4.95

 The mains were up and meat had won again with two of us picking the carnivorous menu option. The piscivores face lit up at the sight of his pan seared loin of yellowfin tuna with smoked haddock brandade, fennel & red onion salad served with warm vierge dressing. The tuna looked perfectly cooked, the smoked haddock brandade (or olive oil emulsion- we googled it) accentuated the rich fish flavour with the aniseedy salad providing some bite. The plate was clean in about five minutes so safe to say it was successful.

Tuna £17.95

I would have been happy with any of the mains on the menu that night but the braised ox cheek drew me in. It was a dish for a cold day, and that it was. The garlic & chive mash and red cabbage were both punchy in their own right, but coupled with the ox cheek and jus, it was a flavoursome mouthful. The dish was perhaps a touch too sweet by the end but there are worse things.

Ox Cheek £16.50

 
Last but not least, a risotto of butternut squash and sage was no drab veggie option. The mascarpone was rich and creamy, the pine nuts threw in some texture whilst watercress gave a peppery element to the dish. A small amount of balsamic left enough of its acidic trail to prevent the dish from being too cloying and the rice had just enough bite. This is the second time I’ve had one of their risottos and both have been mentionable. 

Risotto £13.50

 

Not being able to finish my main course, I wasn’t about to order a dessert but that doesn’t mean that I didn’t eat any. A light cheesecake provided all the ooh’s and ahh’s that a dessert is ever going to get and a delicate coconut ice-cream was far more than just that.

 
 

 

 

I would put Number 16 into the brasserie category in the sense that it is high quality food and wine in relaxed surroundings. The kind of place that you go to for a special occasion but equally as often on a week night for a pre-theatre pick me up. It has a feel good factor in the air that you can’t manufacture and the locals can’t get enough.

 

   

You can read about my first visit to this restaurant here and how it was part of our Hogmanay 2013 here

Glasgow You’re Slipping Out Of My Reach

I’ve got a confession to make. I’ve felt terrible not saying anything on here about it but this morning I decided that the time has come… I’m leaving Glasgow!
By the end of the year I will no longer live in this amazing city and I’m feeling sad about it this morning. Being away from my friends & family up north finally pulled me back to Inverness when a job offer up there came about.

So that’s why things on here have been so quiet recently. Between painting and decluttering the flat, sorting out getting the flat on the market, working full-time & spending as much time with friends down here as possible, it’s been a busy month.
I have a bit of a backlog so I’ve still got some lovely meals to tell you about and the BBC Good Food Show Glasgow. To be honest I’m not sure how I’m going to live without Celino’s, La Lanterna and Tempo Tea (among others) so I’ll be up and down the road regularly for the first year at least to wean myself off these delicious addictions.

I intend to still blog on here whenever I’m down visiting folk so make sure you’re signed up for e-mail notifications. It will just mean relentless eating and drinking in a small space of time- I think I’ll manage!

Until then, keep reading what I’ve been up to recently and follow my second blog, Highland Foodie, as I begin this new journey.

I’m going to miss you more than words can say Glasgow.

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Ale Glorious Ale

I have previously mentioned my newfound love of beer and ale that opens up a whole new world for me. Instead of ‘where serves a good gin’ I’m finding myself thinking ‘where has a good selection of beer that I’ll like’. I admit that I’m still getting used to it and, at the moment, I prefer my lager tops to curb any bitterness. I do like a pale ale and I’ve been trying out a few.

Then I was sent a box of Isle Of Skye Brewing Co ales to try and I felt a post coming on.

 

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The brewery is relatively young and originated from a chat in the pub in 1992 regarding the lack of good beer in Skye. Everyone knows that all the best ideas come from a pub session! It was the first time that I’d tried their beer so I wanted to save it for a night with my more knowledgeable dad.

The brewery has recently rebranded all of their products so there have been a few changes – Red Cuillin’s name change to Red Skye being the main one. I found the new bold labelling to be a good thing – at least I’ll never open the wrong one and will easily pick it out in a shop.

 

Skye Gold (the yellow one) was my first pick because pale ale is one of my favourite things right now. This one is made with the addition of porridge oats and, whilst I couldn’t really taste oats, I could smell them and there was a definite twist to it. It was refreshing and a good new addition to my IPA style collection.

 

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L to R: Skye Red, Skye Gold and Skye Black

 

Skye Red is the Isle Of Skye Brewing Co’s baby as it was the first beer they brewed back in 1995. This is the one that used to be called Red Cuillin and is award winning. I thought that it was lighter in flavour than a lot of red beers that I’ve tasted and my dad agreed. It still had a nice fruityness to it with a slight bitter aftertaste. We thought it could be a perfect session ale for someone who likes red ale due to the lightness.

 

We left Skye Black to last so that it did not cloud our tastebuds for the others. It smells malty and slightly smoky and I was unsure about whether it would be too dark for me. It was too dark for my taste but my dad enjoyed it more. We agreed that it was not as bitter as some dark ales due to the addition of honey but it still had smoky tones to be in-keeping with a darker, stronger tasting ale.

 

It has inspired me to do a Scottish beers post so no doubt my instagram will be full of beer related photos over the next few months. My dads favourite was the Skye Red and I liked the Skye Gold so I’ll be looking out for it on tap in Glasgow now. The ideal situation would be to take another trip to Skye and drink it practically from the source – whilst eating some fresh fish after a walk on the coral beach but this will do for now. After a gander on their website I have seen that they also sell Skye Blaven, which is a stronger brew than the others. That’s part of my fathers day present sorted…thanks Skye Brewing.

 

Eat Local, Drink Local!

 

I want to extend my thanks to Ewan MacGill at Wire, along with all at Skye Brewing Co for sending me beer and alerting me of its presence.

London Love At Barrafina

Almost three years ago when we got married a friend of ours got us a Barrafina cookbook as a wedding present. Since we constantly discussed food together it was a highly appropriate & lovely gift. I did some online research and found that Barrafina is a top tapas restaurant in London and dreamed of going ever since. Once the London flights were booked it was top of the ‘must visit list’ and we did just that.

 

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Barrafina is one of these ‘blink and you’ll miss it’ places – understated and off the main thoroughfare. Thank goodness for my trusty smartphone and google maps. Arriving as their lunch session was finishing we had planned to go for dinner but both being hungry we chanced our hand and were welcomed in.

Just in case you are planning to go I’ll tell you some things that I found out in my research. One is that they don’t accept bookings, two is that it is a teeny tiny place & three is that it’s likely to be packed to the rafters. I didn’t realise quite how small it was until we got there. Seating is all along the bar and there are no tables out with this. I’d guess there’s about fifteen seats in total and I’ve heard that there is a queue most days when they open for lunch and dinner. A ledge goes along the other side of the room and is used to rest drinks on whilst you are waiting for a table. It’s not the kind of place you linger in so it works & I can imagine it’s bustling and ever so Spanish at night.

 

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There were some quick decisions made because we didn’t want to keep them back at the end of lunch (luckily another table came in after us too). We ordered bread with olive oil and then a cold meat platter, which was sliced in front of us when we ordered. Salami, chorizo, jamon Iberico… so simple yet so so good. Quality trounces fancy ever time.

 

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So far the only disappointing thing had been that they did not have balsamic vinegar. And I had over two years of expectations so it was almost a miracle.

Ham croquetas had to be ordered because I’d never make them at home. Fiddly, fried & overindulgent should be kept for restaurants. These little orange balls were crispy and moreish with a hefty amount of bechamel. The ham was strong in flavour so cut through the rich creaminess.

 

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We decided to forgo the octopus with capers for the special fish of the day – seabream stuffed with herbs and lemon. All I have to say about this dish is that it was marvellous. When we returned home we realised that the recipe is in our book and we have made it at home twice now.

 

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Our last offering was a difficult decision. I narrowed the choices down to grilled quail, milk fed lamb and chorizo, potato and watercress. After choosing the former it occurred to me that we had also chosen the meat platter but I guess you can never have too much meat on your birthday. I’m confident that we would have raved about all of the above as much as we did with the chorizo.

 

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Next time I will leave space in my belly for the pears in red wine or Santiago tart. I say next time because I don’t want to imagine never going back here. I’m in love.

 

 

Barrafina on Urbanspoon

Casse-Croûte – A Slice Of Paris In London

During our time in London we were meeting friends that work in Bermondsey. On our last day we decided to meet them for lunch and when I was researching where to go in the area I came across a little French restaurant called Casse-Croûte. It immediately interested me because they don’t have a menu as such – they just update a blackboard with that days offerings and there’s only three starters, three mains and three desserts to choose from. Fresh & seasonal, I like. Sometimes no menu puts me off because I like to get a feel for a place before going, but Casse-Croûte update their Twitter with the days menu every morning so I could pour through past days food. How I wish that restaurants would use their twitter more to display daily specials. Anyway, I mentioned Casse-Croûte to our London locals and they said that it’s a great choice and near their work. The last lunch had been decided!

 

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Casse-Croûte is very small and booking is highly recommended. In that traditional French way the tables are close together and there are no low fat labels in the kitchen. It reminded me of the cute places in Paris. The menu is in French and our waitress was French but she kindly translated everything for us without asking.
We tried everything on the menu between us but I could have enjoyed any single dish that they were serving.

There was a classic tomato soup – blitzed so you get no pesky bits and with a slight acidity.

 

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A starter of smoked haddock with leek and a soft egg was another demonstration from the chef of classic cooking done well. What I would do right now to be sitting there eating this dish again!

 

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The third starter on the menu was cheese soufflé. For some reason I am always suspicious of soufflé. Puffed egg with a side flavour, I’m not too sure about this. And what if I get bored of egg halfway through and have to leave it. I tried a bite of someone else’s and clearly I’d misjudged this soufflé. I can’t speak for other soufflés because I never choose them but this particular one definitely made me rethink my self imposed soufflé ban. It was light with a crunchy outside and had just the right cheese level.

 

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By now I was feeling smug with myself that I’d spent so long researching London blogs & found Casse-Croûte. For my main I chose the baked ham with potato purée and mustard sauce. Next time I am choked with the cold this is what I will be dreaming about. Comfort food of the highest order.

 

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A simple dish of sole in a buttery and caper sauce arrived with a couple of steamed potatoes but lacked any other vegetables. It still got the thumbs up from the two gents at the table.

 

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The creamy veal stew was served with rice & was another wintery dish with great flavouring.

 

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Ordinarily we would not have eaten dessert but because this was the last London meal (and the last time we’d eat in a long time!) we had to try them. I had the Pavé De Faubourg, which was a slice of chocolate cake with mandarins in the middle & a drizzle of mandarin & black pepper sauce. I liked the idea of the dessert and the mandarin element was tasty but the cake itself was lacking in moisture for me.

 

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The tarte tatin on the other hand, was simply terrific. The apples were not hard nor sloppy and the pastry was not too thick. The sweetness level was perfect and the dollop of cream was just enough.

 

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The final dessert was visually one of my favourite things that I had been served in a long time and it also delivered on taste. The Saint Honoré started with thin pastry then there was a sturdy crème pâtissière (crème chiboust I presume) and a choux ball filled with cream and dipped in caramelised sugar on the side.

 

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Casse-Croûte was the perfect way to end our London gastronomy trip for my 30th birthday. It has a buzzy atmosphere and fine solid cooking that took me back to my Paris trip. The presentation was of a high standard and I like the personalised plates. The service was superb and speedy for those going back to work. I love the vibe that I got from the place – it was such a strong ‘this is what we are, like us or not’ with the menu and such. There were a couple of niggly negatives but the whole experience made up for them and I will certainly be back here.

 

Casse Croute on Urbanspoon

You can read more about my trip to London in other posts here:

https://girlaroundglasgow.wordpress.com/2014/04/09/chez-bruce/

 

 

Las Iguanas Launch Party

I’ve been to a few launch parties now but none with latin dancers and such a party atmosphere as Las Iguanas on West Nile Street. It was loud, lively and opened the place with a bang.

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There was plenty fizz, rum cocktail, sangria, caipirinhas, wine and beer going around and the place was packed. I tried a bit of everything in the name of research and all of the drinks get the thumbs up from me. They are very proud of their caipirinhas because they make them with their own branded cachaca.

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They were generous with the food too. It started with the tortilla chips, salsa and guacamole that was on the tables then the staff started handing out a selection of food from their menu. I liked almost all of the food that I tried. There were shot glasses with various sauces like black bean & bacon (not for me) and coconut curry sauce (delicious). Empanadas, quesadillas, meat skewers, leaves cupping various meats in sauces and more.

 

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My favourite was the garlic mushroom quesadilla – there’s no boring veggie options here. In fact, I came with a vegetarian and when the PR lady found out she returned with a veggie platter especially for her. Nice touch.

 

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After feeding us, the team at Las Iguanas then treated us to some funky dancing from the professionals before getting the rest of us on the dance floor for a try.

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The whole place and atmosphere screamed fun and, although the place won’t be that lively every day, it could be an ideal place for hens and other groups.

 

 

I’d like to extend my thanks to Loop PR & the staff at Las Iguanas for inviting me.