scottish food

Guest Post: City Chic Glasgow Weekend on a Budget

Today’s post comes from fellow blogger Emily, over at Borders & Burpees.

How to do a City Chic Glasgow Weekend on a Budget

Visiting Scotland’s biggest city, known for its gastronomic food scene, spectacular entertainment and the glamorous Style Mile sounds like it would be a very expensive excursion! Fear not, there are some absolutely fantastic ways to spend time in Glasgow without breaking the bank. With three large universities and just over 20 colleges, Glasgow has a thriving student population to accommodate for!

You can find budget-friendly activities almost everywhere you go in this city. From West End vintage shopping and theatre, to City Centre galleries and restaurants, to South-Side high-tech hotels!

We have put together this little guide to getting the most out of your next city-chic, budget weekend in Glasgow –

What to Do

When getting to Glasgow, you probably landed in the middle of the City Centre! Glasgow is often considered Scotland’s shopping mecca. Heading down the Style Mile, a densely-packed collection of shops over three streets, can be an interesting experience – even without going into the shops! Bagpipe buskers in full traditional dress and up-and-coming musicians fill the air with sound. At the weekend, Sloan’s Market can be found just off Buchanan Street, where the lanes bustle with handmade crafts, gifts and treats.

The best bargain-hunting experience can be found in the City’s West End. Jump on the subway at Buchanan Street and get off at Hillhead for a jaunt around the many vintage, antique and pre-loved shops. This leafy, bohemian and attractive neighbourhood is home to the likes of Starry Starry Night, The Glasgow Vintage Co. and Retro. Pop by the luscious Botanical Gardens while you are in the area for a quick look through the Glasshouses.

Still in the West End, for around £14 you can get yourself into a stunning converted church, the Oran Mor, for a play, a pie & a pint! Various Scottish acts perform great wee plays at lunchtime, you can sometimes catch the odd celeb here and there also!

Where to Eat

Refresh yourself after all that hard work shopping! Glasgow is well known for its ties to the legendary Charles Rennie Mackintosh architect, designer and artist. Born in Glasgow, Mackintosh has helped design and inspire so many unique buildings and interiors with his elegant work. You will likely see his style in many places during your visit, particularly if you hop over to The Glasgow School of Art, Scotland Street Museum and The Lighthouse!

One place I particularly like to visit is the Willow Tea Rooms. You can truly immerse yourself in his design and delight in a really great afternoon tea! Get a table by the window and you can watch one of the major shopping streets below. Considering the overall experience, the menu is a great price and what you would expect for some simple-but-delicious sandwiches and cakes.

If you are interested in getting your entertainment while you eat, check out theButterfly and the Pig over on trendy Bath Street. Shabby-chic, floral interiors make way for laid back open mic nights, jazz, blues and more. Expect no-fuss mouthwatering comfort food from the main menu, or book in for a night-time high tea experience.

Where to Stay

Village Hotel in Glasgow is a very suave place to stay when on a budget. It is positioned just next to the river, south of the City Centre, and so it is very close to the Hydro and SECC. These are great venues in Glasgow for all sorts of gigs, conferences and days out. The rooms themselves are very contemporary and stylish – a lot of sleek surfaces!

The hotel itself has touchscreen check-in, a mini art gallery, spa, Starbucks, bar and gym. From time to time they have entertainment on-venue too. They often run offers where you can get a room for as low as £50 a night, occasionally this even includes dinner!

So, come on over to Glasgow and experience this beautiful city for yourself!

You can read more of Emily McLaren’s articles over at http://www.bordersandburpees.co.uk

Images sourced from Creative Commons

Number 16 – Should Be Up Every Glasgow Street

 

Not every dinner that I write about involves masses of time taking photos and researching – life is for living after all. The night in question this time was spent in Number 16 restaurant on Byres Road, in the heart of Glasgows West End. Unbeknown to me, this meal was the last restaurant blow-out that I would have for a while involving copious amounts of vino now that I’m on a nine month plus sabbatical so I’m glad it was such an enjoyable night. 

The photos are terrible due to low lighting issues and prosecco, but they’re the only ones I have so I’m including them anyway. 
The first starter to arrive is a dish that showcases what I would describe as Number 16’s signature style – they excel at Asian cooking as much as they do Scottish & you’re always flipping a coin in there over which route to go down. It was Asian spiced beef tempura with wasabi mayonnaise, sweet chilli, coriander and pickled radish. Tempura doesn’t often look pretty but they managed it here, and kept the batter light and crisp. Scooping a bit of each element of the dish into each mouthful was important here to appreciate the sweet, spicy, acidic flavours as one & it was a fantastic dish. 

 

Tempura £7.50

 
  

Crispy ham hock terrine won as the starter of preference with two of the table choosing it. No 16 served it with vanilla & apple purée, sweet & sour raisins and piccalilli but the accompaniments sounded too sweet for me. The two of them thought it was delicious and, having tried some, I changed my mind too although I’m not one for vanilla with savoury. 

Terrine £6.50

 I’ve had soup in here before and they always pull it off so I don’t feel hard done by looking at other starters as I sometimes do in other restaurants with soup. This time it was cream of wild mushroom with tarragon and white truffle oil. Consistency and depth of flavour were exactly perfect for me and the tarragon shone through without eclipsing the mushrooms. The truffle oil added an earthy element and further emphasised the shrooms in the dish. 

Soup £4.95

 The mains were up and meat had won again with two of us picking the carnivorous menu option. The piscivores face lit up at the sight of his pan seared loin of yellowfin tuna with smoked haddock brandade, fennel & red onion salad served with warm vierge dressing. The tuna looked perfectly cooked, the smoked haddock brandade (or olive oil emulsion- we googled it) accentuated the rich fish flavour with the aniseedy salad providing some bite. The plate was clean in about five minutes so safe to say it was successful.

Tuna £17.95

I would have been happy with any of the mains on the menu that night but the braised ox cheek drew me in. It was a dish for a cold day, and that it was. The garlic & chive mash and red cabbage were both punchy in their own right, but coupled with the ox cheek and jus, it was a flavoursome mouthful. The dish was perhaps a touch too sweet by the end but there are worse things.

Ox Cheek £16.50

 
Last but not least, a risotto of butternut squash and sage was no drab veggie option. The mascarpone was rich and creamy, the pine nuts threw in some texture whilst watercress gave a peppery element to the dish. A small amount of balsamic left enough of its acidic trail to prevent the dish from being too cloying and the rice had just enough bite. This is the second time I’ve had one of their risottos and both have been mentionable. 

Risotto £13.50

 

Not being able to finish my main course, I wasn’t about to order a dessert but that doesn’t mean that I didn’t eat any. A light cheesecake provided all the ooh’s and ahh’s that a dessert is ever going to get and a delicate coconut ice-cream was far more than just that.

 
 

 

 

I would put Number 16 into the brasserie category in the sense that it is high quality food and wine in relaxed surroundings. The kind of place that you go to for a special occasion but equally as often on a week night for a pre-theatre pick me up. It has a feel good factor in the air that you can’t manufacture and the locals can’t get enough.

 

   

You can read about my first visit to this restaurant here and how it was part of our Hogmanay 2013 here

Scran and Scallie

I’ve had The Kitchin restaurant in Edinburgh at the top of my most wanted list for a long time. They have a long waiting list (I’m not the best planner that far in advance) and it would need to be saved for a special occasion so we have not made it yet. Then I heard about The Scran & Scallie, a gastropub in Edinburgh owned by Tom Kitchin & Dominic Jack. They do not accept reservations so there was no real planning required except from getting there before peak dining time because I’d heard that they fill up pretty quickly.

There are a lot of 30th birthday celebrations going on this year and this was one of them. Therefore we arrived in Edinburgh later than planned as we took a gin and tonic detour! To set us up for the walk to Stockbridge we nipped into Harvey Nichols fourth floor Window Bar to enjoy a cocktail with that amazing view.

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It took us about half an hour to walk to Stockbridge but I enjoy looking at all of the old buildings and indulging in a bit of house lust. We arrived about 4.30pm but we were told that they don’t start serving food until 5pm (they also serve lunch earlier) so we could sit and have a drink until service starts. The bar area is quite small and appears to be more for people having a drink waiting for tables than an actual bar.

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Williams Bros £1.95 & Orkney IPA £2.50 (half pints)

Tables have to be back in an hour and a half in the restaurant area. To me The Scran & Scallie is not a pub because in a pub that does food they usually serve meals all day, you’d wouldn’t be told to give the table back so soon on a Wednesday and there would be more people using it as a boozer. It felt more like a restaurant. Not a problem but that is how it appeared to me. If we had arrived an hour earlier I would have been annoyed that the website did not state the food service times and table back policy. We’d come all the way from Glasgow for it- the least they can do in return is be upfront. That is not to take away from the place because the decor and feel of it is a delightful mix of Scottish and Scandinavian with simple furnishings and lots of wood. I really enjoyed our visit.

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Warm bread arrived in a mini sack and I had soon forgotten about our table wait.

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Their whole ethos is ‘from nature to plate’ so I knew that the squat lobster ravioli with asparagus would be freshly made. The three ravioli were in a creamy but fresh sauce and the asparagus was fantastic with it.

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Ox tongue on toast should be the new comfort food, it certainly ticks the rich and satisfying boxes. The bone marrow continued the theme with its jellied meatiness. And the egg, I’m not sure it was even needed, but I never question a soft egg on my plate. Especially a flavoursome, proper farm egg.

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Steak pie, hogget, steak pie, hogget? Choices, choices. I really wanted the ham and chips but I didn’t want us to order the same main. I had never tried hogget before so I didn’t want to pass up an opportunity. It is a slow cooked meat and had an even softer texture than lamb shank. Darker in colour, it is more intense than meat from a younger sheep. To be honest, I found it too strong in flavour for me. I liked the peas surrounding it but felt that some mash would not have gone amiss. I ordered a side of potatoes as well but they did not really match up with the dish and just notched the already expensive (£19) price up.

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The ham, egg and chips came with a side of contented silence. The presentation got top marks from us, the taste of the ham also got top marks. The homemade pineapple salsa is something that we’ve tried to recreate since but have never managed to get it exactly correct. In my opinion the egg did not need the breadcrumbs but that’s being pernickity. I hope that this dish never comes off the menu.

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As I mentioned before, the hogget was rich and I couldn’t manage the whole thing so took it home with me to give to Mr S. Bar my vaccum packed steak at Chez Bruce, it was the fanciest looking doggy bag I’d had.

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Apple crumble came with its own jug of custard. Great balance ratio of fruit to crumble with a slight crunch on top.

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I chose lemon curd and meringue & it came in an elegant champagne coupe. It was a cross between a lemon posset and lemon curd with a layer of biscuity crumble and then delicate piped meringues sitting on top. Lovely.

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It is undeniable that I was impressed by The Scran & Scallie. The food was all of a high standard and the presentation impressive. I still feel slightly confused by the marketing but maybe that’s just me. I won’t be back for three courses because I felt rushed at the end but the ham, egg and chips warrants a second visit.

The Scran & Scallie on Urbanspoon

prices: starters £9

mains £18/19

desserts £5.50/5.75

I’m In A Book, Mum!

This week saw the launch of a new Cookery book called The Foodies Guide To Glasgow & The West. The book is the result of heaps of hard work by Fraser Wilson, a fellow blogger, putting the whole thing together. It is a collection of recipes submitted by Glasgow’s restaurateurs, chefs and bloggers.

 

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Recipes from some of my personal favourite, and Glasgow’s top, restaurants are included. Places like Guys, The Gannet, Rogano & La Parmigiana make the Glasgow culinary scene what it is & now I can take a hint of it to my kitchen.

 

Le Chardon D'or

Le Chardon D’or

 

Fraser has also added reviews throughout the book and there are pages focusing on how to get the best out of your local produce, such as the Butchershop’s steak guide. For the real foodies among us, some of Glasgow’s chefs leave a foreword on their recipe page.

 

The Gannet's Peter McKenna & Ivan Stein

The Gannet’s Peter McKenna & Ivan Stein

 

And of course there’s a blogger section that features my pork recipe that Mr S & I love so much. Pork is massively underrated & marred by ‘porky’ tasting supermarket meat from the 80’s. Now you can get some fantastic tasting meat – give pork a second chance!

 

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For each copy of the book sold a 50p donation goes to Mary’s Meals, a charity that sets up school feeding projects for those who can’t afford to feed themselves. The charity helps children in poverty all around the world get an education – something badly needed for the 57 million children around the world not in school.

 

The book is priced at £9 and can be bought from Amazon (here) and will soon be available from other local retailers.

Roaming To Stravaigin

The first time I went to Stravaigin in Gibson Street was almost 7 years ago. I was there with Mr S and his family to celebrate his graduation & I remember thinking the menu was so adventurous. I had monkfish with risotto – I can barely remember things from last month but my brain carved out space for remembering that risotto. Recently we were in the West End and decided to pop in for dinner.

 

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Stravaigin is an old Scottish word that means to roam or wander so it seems appropriate for the food that is inspired by different places around the world. They have traditional Scottish dishes such as haggis, neeps & tatties and then they have things from further afield like nasi goreng and frittata.

We had not booked and, as it was a Friday night, it was heaving. We were told it would be about half an hour for a table – the perfect amount of time to enjoy one of their French Martini’s at the bar. Stravaigin is split into three areas. There is the more formal restaurant downstairs, the relaxed upstairs restaurant and the bar. I’ve heard that some of it is also dog friendly for those not wanting to leave the pooch at home.

 

I love the lights in the bar

I love the lights in the bar

 

We were sat on the mezzanine level in the relaxed upstairs part. This part of the place is very bistro-esque with a relaxed atmosphere and smallish, close knit tables. There were rumbling bellies so we ordered some bread and steamed west coast mussels, sweet chilli & coriander. We were glad we ordered the bread because the tasty mussel juices were begging to be mopped up.

 

Mussels £6.45, bread £1.95

Mussels £6.45, bread £1.95

 

Only then did we decide on our main feasts. Mr S opted for the seared featherblade and I was excited by the venison special. There seems to be a fashion for using tastier, non-traditional cuts of beef at the moment and Mr S almost always chooses this option. I’ve seen skirt steak and flank steak and I’ve heard of featherblade but this was my first time tasting it. These meats are always served red/pink because they go tough if they are cooked any longer. Mr S really enjoyed it & was also raving about the chunky chips and flatcap mushrooms that accompanied it. Good portion size too. After ordering dishes like this three times now it was rated as second best out of the three. He didn’t like the chimichurri sauce that accompanied it and I’d be inclined to agree. I don’t want an oily sauce to accompany steak and I’ve never been converted to chimichurri. For bread maybe but not steak. When it arrived we tasted the chimichurri then asked our waitress for some whisky sauce instead. Within five minutes we were back on track with a ‘want to lick the dish’ whisky sauce.

 

£16.95

£16.95

 

 

My venison haunch was served with carrot purée, rosemary sautéed baby potatoes and jerusalem artichokes and a neep relish. The dish looked good and I like a vegetable crisp on top of a dish for bite. All of the elements of the dish complemented each other well so credit to the chef who designed the dish. The venison haunch was tasty, if slightly more cooked than I would have liked (but I understand that everyone likes venison cooked to varying levels). My only real niggle was that there was a smattering of gravy/jus around the plate but nowhere near enough. The bites I took that had some were greatly improved by those that did not. I shared the whisky sauce (that actually went with the flavourings) but if that had not have been on the table I would not have enjoyed the dish as much.

 

£18.95

£18.95

 

 

To end the meal we shared some homemade churned mint chocolate ice-cream with an Anzac cookie. The ice-cream had an amazing flavour and obviously used quality ingredients. I wouldn’t usually have chosen mint chocolate but it was the ice-cream of the day so thought we’d order it & it was a good move. It was quite difficult to eat melting ice-cream on a slightly warm plate instead of a bowl but it just made us eat quicker! We’ll know to ask for a bowl next time.

 

£5.25

£5.25

 

 

On another note, I want to mention that they do wine flights for you to enjoy with your meal because I love this idea. I am a slow drinker so a few smaller measures means I can try more.

We had a terrific impromptu meal at Stravaigin and I look forward to roaming back sometime soon.

 

 

 

 

Three Courses At The Gannet

Every so often a restaurant opens that I get really excited about – somewhere that I know in my gut will be marvellous. In 2013 this restaurant was The Gannet on Argyle Street. I love the name and we were looking forward to being Gannets for the night. It’s hardly surprising that it is located in Finnieston where all the cool kids play. Two renowned chefs, Ivan Stein & Peter McKenna, got together with a business partner to open this dainty bar and restaurant. I heard much about it online before it opened but there was no pre-opening blogger night that I know of so I never found the right time to visit until February.

 

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The reason for my delay in writing is because I felt I needed more time to weigh up my thoughts on the place and then March madness happened and suddenly it was almost two months ago. So now I’ve decided to just write and see what comes out.

 

We booked our table almost three weeks in advance because we were going on a Saturday night and on the Saturday at noon we received a voicemail to confirm the booking. I like efficiency so this was a plus but when Mr S phoned back we were told that the table was to be back in 1 hour and 45 minutes. Now, I’ll just get the rant out of the way now because this really gave me a negative impression before I had even visited. If we had been told when we originally booked the table then I completely understand but telling us on the day is a bit like when you get a letter from the bank changing the terms and conditions on your bank account and suddenly charging you for something new – you never signed up for that and feel hard done by. After a discussion we called back and asked if it would be possible to come in half an hour earlier than we had booked for so that we didn’t feel rushed and they said that was fine.

 

On arrival the place was buzzing and is obviously popular. We were seated upstairs in a cosy little bit with four tables.

 

Now the important food stuff. A starter of scallops, celeriac, chicken wing and sauce stuck out for me in the menu. I like all of them individually but would they taste as good on one plate? In my opinion yes they did. Rich celeriac purée muddled with the meaty, salty wing and the almost sweet scallop. There was also a ring of celeriac on the plate that provided a bit more bite but I would have preferred more purée. Saying that, I thought this was a fabulous starter.

 

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Scallops £9.50

 

Crisp rabbit croquettes with piccalilli arrived as 6 bite sized squares of rabbit with the piccalilli around about them. They were indeed very crispy little game bites and the piccalilli was robust enough to match them.

 

Rabbit Croquettes £6

Rabbit Croquettes £6

 

The special starter when we were visiting was langoustines and, if I remember correctly, were priced at £11.50. What was on the plate was good – it was simple so displayed the fresh seafood at its best. It was just a tiny portion and this eclipsed all else because you were left feeling unsatisfied. Three langoustines came out of the kitchen instead of the usual five or six that restaurants dish up. There was also no tools offered to help get the meat out from the claws so it was difficult to take advantage of what was there.

 

Langoustines

Langoustines

 

We had a delicious Sauvignon Blanc to wash everything down with and to keep us happy whilst waiting for the main courses. I was looking forward to my slow cooked loin of Ardunan farm pork, potato, spinach, crisp salsify and pork sauce. When it arrived I tucked straight in and knew straight away that I had made the right choice. The pork itself was shoulders above any pork loin that I had tried – it had a beautiful flavour and was cooked perfectly. The plate was expertly balanced and really showcased the chefs cooking.

 

Pork £17.50

Pork £17.50

 

There was a fish special ordered but I forgot to write the description down so fish lovers can just lust over the photo. It was met with positive reviews anyway and that is the important thing.

 

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Last to reach the table was the Perthshire venison, red cabbage, butternut squash and game sauce. We had enquired and told that it also came with potato, which arrived as a semi-circle of creamy tatties with a crispy exterior. Again the meat tasted top notch – they are obviously using excellent suppliers and proud of it. The dish was sweet and intense so maybe this was the reason for the small portion size. The general consensus at the table was that it was a ladies portion size and needed that wee bit extra for a man (as terribly sexist as that may sound).

 

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Venison £20

 

Three chocolate fondants and a pear & almond tart with ice-cream were coming our way. The chat stopped on arrival and did not resume for a few minutes – the desserts got the thumbs up. The chocolate fondant was gooey (if I hear on one more cookery show how hard this is to do then I will scream at the tv) and chocolatey, exactly what I wanted and expected. It was served with an ice-cream that tasted like lemon but the pear tart was served with vanilla. we all preferred the vanilla so if I chose it again I’d ask for that.

 

Chocolate Fondant £6

Chocolate Fondant £6

 

Coffees were coming (they also got the thumbs up) but time was getting on and we had to drink them quickly to vacate the table for the time we were told. It was a busy Saturday so there was a fair wait between courses and I don’t mind this at all providing we are given the time to allow it. I did not feel that we were particularly slow at choosing or eating so I’d recommend that you check at the time of booking about their table back by procedure.

 

Pear Tart £5

Pear Tart £5

 

Presentation of every dish was excellent and I found it refreshing that there was not a slate or wooden board in sight.

 

We ended up five minutes over our time but would have stayed longer and ordered more drinks. Instead we nipped along the road to three different bars that were all stowd before jumping in a taxi to the bar at the Grand Central for a cocktail.

 

It was an expensive meal but the quality of the food and the cooking were of a very high standard. Mr S would not rush back because of the portion sizes and booking service but I really want to go back to see if this was an isolated experience because I see such potential. New restaurants are constantly tweaking things and I am sure that The Gannet is no different.

 

 

Gannet on Urbanspoon

Bo’Vine

This post is a bit late because I was humming and hawing over whether to use it or not but I decided today to put it on so here goes…

 

I know Byres Road pretty well as I work nearby so go for post-work dinner regularly. On the corner of Byres Road is The Hilton Hotel & the restaurant attached is called Bo’Vine. It is a fancy steak restaurant that opened in 2010. For me their appeal is their excellent value pre-theatre menu, where you can get two courses including a rib eye steak for £14.50.

 

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We ordered drinks and I went straight to the red wine because there was no doubt in my mind that i was having steak. I’ve been in here before and they do a lovely bottle of Pinot Noir, so nice that I bought a case of it online afterwards.

To start we both ordered the Stornoway black pudding, poached hens egg, pancetta & red wine jus. This, or a variation of, is a tried and tested starter with me that I know I like in restaurants. I’m sure I’ll have written about my black pudding love previously so I’ll not bore you. Anyway, this dish is like posh comfort food – it’s filling, a bit sinful but I know what I’m getting when I order it. The egg was perfectly runny and the jus was tasty.

 

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The steak on the pre-theatre was chargrilled rib eye with triple cooked chips and a peppercorn sauce. I’m more of a bearnaise girl so I asked for bearnaise instead of peppercorn & I was told that there would be an extra charge for this.
The steaks arrived and we’d ordered a portion of truffled macaroni alongside it to try. Both of us enjoy a good macaroni but, shock horror, we didn’t like it. The pasta used was macaroni (I have a bugbear about places advertising macaroni then serving other types of pasta!) and I could taste truffle so as the description goes it was pretty accurate but we never enjoyed the dish. The sauce was like a white sauce with added truffle and it seriously lacked flavour & seasoning. We only ate a couple of mouthfuls each and then pushed it to the side.

 

Truffled Macaroni £3

Truffled Macaroni £3

 

On the other hand, Bo’Vine do excellent chips. Big, chunky fellas that are perfect for steak and dipping in a pot of steak sauce. They have obviously spent time and effort crafting a good quality product and I appreciate this.

 

 

Our steaks had that nice chargrilled flavour & the meat was flavoursome. My medium rare steak was undercooked but I enjoyed it nonetheless. We never discussed until we were almost finished that my dining companions rare steak was overcooked so I think they got our steaks mixed up when they put them down. I have always wondered how steak restaurant staff know which steak is which and what their system is. Do they put coloured cocktail sticks in them and remove them on the pass? Anyway, it’s an easy mistake to make & didn’t ruin our meal although I know some diners would have sent them back.

 

Yes, I started eating again before taking the photo!

Yes, I started eating again before taking the photo!

 

We ploughed on like the troopers that we are to have a dessert to write about. A pannacotta and a brownie were ordered for reporting purposes. The vanilla pannacotta was served with ice-cream & was rich and creamy but lacking in something. Another taste like a coulis would have added a lacking element to the dish.

 

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My chocolate and peanut butter brownie was soft but not moist enough for me and lacking in peanut butter flavour. It was fine but not fantastic – a real shame because I have tried the doughnuts & sundae in here on previous occasions and they were both delicious.

 

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When the bill arrived I had indeed been charged extra for my bearnaise sauce – £3 extra. This is where they make their money then. Hmm.

The reason I wasn’t sure whether to publish this post was because I enjoyed this visit less than I’d enjoyed previous visits so I felt it unfair to write negative feedback. I have been trying to pinpoint my general thoughts about Bo’Vine and this is what I’ve come up with. It’s a bit pretentious in decor & formal staff but this probably does not bother much of their clientele of businessmen and women staying at the hotel. Personally I feel that if they toned that down then it would be a better place. The steak is of a high quality but for me this is firmly in the pre-theatre category because it’s expensive and, quite frankly, there are other Glasgow steak restaurants that I like the ambience of better. But, the pre-theatre menu offers great value & it’s the only steak place around Byres Road, and I like the wine. They are also very patient letting you sit for a while after your meal so that’s another plus point. I’ll go back but I guess Bo’Vine has captured my head but not my heart. I don’t feel romantic about it in the same way I often do about places that I’m loyal to. I’m a bit of a sap like that! I’ve always liked the Michel De Montaigne quote ‘the art of dining well is no slight art, the pleasure not a slight pleasure’ and this is how I see it. Maybe Bo’Vine is a grower, we’ll see.

 

 

Bo'Vine on Urbanspoon